Sunday – March 24 2013, “How to Ruin a Dinner Party”

March 24 2013 – Read the Word on Worship

How to Ruin a Dinner Party from Sunrise Community Church on Vimeo.

Do not let the Lord’s Table become more of an opportunity to examine your watch than your heart. We are more focused on schedules in our hurried lifestyles than we are concerned about how we may have betrayed our Lord this past week or how we might betray Him next week. Each of us should humbly contemplate our lives and consider all the ways, big and small, we have betrayed the Lord and confess such weakness. If one of the twelve who spent three years with Jesus could betray the Lord, every Christian has that potential.
Join us tomorrow as we continue our study of the Gospel of Mark 14 and see “How to Ruin a Dinner Party”.


Word On Worship – March 24 2013 Download / Print

 Mark 14:22-24
While they were eating, He took some bread, and after a blessing He broke it, and gave it to them, and said, “Take it; this is My body.” And when He had taken a cup and given thanks, He gave it to them, and they all drank from it. And He said to them, “This is My blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many.”

The eating of the bread and the drinking of the cup is not a magic ritual. Its consumption brings no automatic guarantee of salvation. If Judas participated in the meal, and there is no indication in the passage that he did not, then eating the bread and drinking the cup must be internalized for it to be of saving value. The new covenant must be written on the hearts of God’s people, not completed by ritual in a stain glassed building. This is not the food of immortality, but a public proclamation of the Lord’s death until He returns.

When we come to this table, we are to examine ourselves just as the original disciples did. The Last Supper was not a sacrament of blessing, but a night of high tension and sweaty palms. Jesus had told them one who sat at the table would betray Him. The gathered disciples did not single out Judas as the guilty party, but rather looked to themselves and asked if it were them. Self examination, not cross examination, is Paul’s exhortation to us in 1st Corinthians 11:27-29 when we gather to partake in this meal. We are only worthy of the Lord’s Supper when we recognize how unworthy we are. Its power is seen when we recognize Jesus has died for us and accepts us in spite of our unworthiness.

Yes, Judas was the one at the table guilty of treason, but none of the disciples are above reproach. Each of them will prove themselves to be an unfaithful servant before the night is done. In truth, the remaining eleven were concerned about themselves. We are no different in our egocentric approach to the table. Our separation and isolation from each other stands revealed before the bread and the cup. The Last Supper calls us to imitate Christ’s self-sacrificing love and should be a moment when we look to heal the breaks in our fellowship.

Do not let the Lord’s Table become more of an opportunity to examine your watch than your heart. We are more focused on schedules in our hurried lifestyles than we are concerned about how we may have betrayed our Lord this past week or how we might betray Him next week. Each of us should humbly contemplate our lives and consider all the ways, big and small, we have betrayed the Lord and confess such weakness. If one of the twelve who spent three years with Jesus could betray the Lord, every Christian has that potential.

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